Should I have a business Twitter profile?

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Maintaining multiple Twitter accounts and attracting followers to multiple profiles can be challenging, so in general you'll be more successful with fewer profiles. Whether you should have a business profile depends on the size of your business:

Solo Practitioners
For a solo practitioner, you should have one personal account to use for business purposes. Because it is a personal account representing an individual, the mix of content should be both professional and personal. You should experiment to find the appropriate mix for your target audience. If you find yourself using the Twitter profile more than 50% of the time for personal use, then you may want to have two profiles: one with a business slant and one that is purely personal. You may also want to consider a pseudonym for your personal account to avoid content you post showing in search results for your name. This approach should only be used for advanced Twitter users who have the time and passion to successfully grow and maintain multiple accounts. Otherwise, one account that is more professional than personal is recommended.

Silo and Ensemble Firms
For firms with multiple advisors, a business profile is recommended. This account should be used entirely for professional content; however, showing a human side of the firm through this account is also encouraged (e.g., candid office photos). This account should be managed by a designated person(s) in the firm to ensure consistency in the firm's voice and in the frequency of posts.

Individual advisors may also have their own accounts if they are interested in engaging on the platform. If an advisor is representing the company in any way, they should tweet a mix of professional and personal content. There should be more emphasis on professional content, but the personal content gives the advisor more depth and, as a result, makes it easier for others to personally connect with the advisor online. 

If advisors find that they are using the Twitter profile more than 50% of the time for personal use, then they may want to have two profiles: one with a business slant and one that is purely personal. Advisors may also want to consider a pseudonym for the personal account to avoid posts showing in search results for the advisor's name. This approach should be used only for advanced Twitter users who have the time and passion to successfully grow and maintain multiple accounts. Otherwise, one account that is more professional than personal is recommended.